Google Could Face Challenge To Its Privacy Settlement With FTC

Consumer Watchdog is looking to get a shot at challenging Google’s $22.5-million settlementwith the Federal Trade Commission over alleged privacy violations.

Consumer Group Files Motion To Oppose Google, FTC Settlement

The settlement agreement between the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and Google, which cost the search giant $22.5 million in penalty charges, is being challenged in court.

Consumer Group Asks FCC To Require More 4G Disclosure

Consumer advocate group Consumer Watchdog is asking the Federal Communications Commission to require carriers to list the speed of their 4G networks in advertisements and at the point of sale.

Google Would Pay Record FTC Fine Under Tentative Apple Safari Settlement

Google officials have called the use of tracking cookies an accident caused by technical glitches that have been corrected. Privacy advocates have scoffed at those explanations. “When they get caught with their fingers in the cookie jar doing something they clearly should not be doing, they say, ‘Oops, it was completely by accident,’ ” said John M. Simpson of Consumer Watchdog, based in Santa Monica, Calif., and one of several groups to file complaints about Google’s alleged tracking on Apple browsers.

Sergey Brin Pounds Fists Against Walled Gardens

“Whenever Google raises the cry of defending Internet freedom, it’s always really about what’s best for Google’s business model,” John Simpson, consumer advocate at Consumer Watchdog, told TechNewsWorld.

Reding: Google Privacy Policy Is Illegal

California-based Google critic Consumer Watchdog called Google’s sweeping changes a “spy policy” rather than a privacy policy, an allusion to the fact that the move will help Google funnel data on users in one larger silo for targeted ads.

Google Privacy Policy Strikes Out With EU, Others

“Calling this a privacy policy is Orwellian doublespeak,” John Simpson, privacy project director for Consumer Watchdog and a longtime Google critic, said in a statement. “Google isn’t telling you about protecting your privacy. Google is telling you how they will gather information about you on all of its services, combine it in new ways and use the fat new digital dossiers to sell more ads. They’re telling you how they plan to spy on you.”

Google Enforces New Privacy Policy, Despite International Outcry About Its Implications

“Calling this a ‘privacy policy’ is Orwellian doublespeak,” said John M. Simpson, Consumer Watchdog’s Privacy Project Director. “Google isn’t telling you about protecting your privacy. Google is telling you how they will gather information about you on all its services, combine it in new ways and use the fat new digital dossiers to sell more ads. They’re telling you how they plan to spy on you. It’s a spy policy.”

Google Rolls Out New Privacy Policy Amid Howls

“Calling this a ‘privacy policy’ is Orwellian doublespeak,” said John Simpson of the US advocacy group Consumer Watchdog.

Google’s Privacy Rules Grow, But Do Protections?

“Google claims that it’s attempting to streamline its policies — in fact, it’s about building even more detailed digital dossiers about the people who use Google services so that Google will get more ad revenue.,” says John M. Simpson, director of Consumer Watchdog’s Privacy Project, a California-based non-profit organization.“

Five Privacy Groups Urge Congresswoman For Public Hearing On Google Changes

The letter was signed by Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), Jeffrey Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy (CDD), John Simpson, privacy policy director at Consumer Watchdog, Susan Grant, director of consumer protection at the Consumer Federation of America (CFA), and Ed Mierzwinski, consumer program director for the U.S. Public Interest Research Groups (PIRG).

White House Plan For Privacy Bill Of Rights Could Boost Protections, Consumer Watchdog Joins Groups Issuing Principles For Fair Process, Voices Some Concerns

SANTA MONICA, CA – The Obama Administration’s blueprint to protect online privacy with a “Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights” unveiled today could provide meaningful protections, Consumer Watchdog said, but warned that the test of its effectiveness will come as the implementation unfolds. The nonprofit, nonpartisan public interest group also voiced a concern that an announced Internet industry commitment to honor “Do Not Track” could be aimed at undercutting an effort by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to create a strict Do Not Track standard.