Google’s WiFi Snoop – Who Knew and Who Didn’t?

“The FTC needs to ask what did Google know and when did Google know it,” says John Simpson. “Google’s suggestion for a third-party audit is inadequate…That would be like like getting to pick and pay the referees in a championship basketball game. This investigation must be done by a regulatory authority capable of imposing real sanctions.”

Consumer Watchdog Calls on FTC to Investigate Google’s WiFi Snooping

Consumer Watchdog today called on the Federal Trade Commission to launch an immediate probe of Google’s snooping on private WiFi networks as the Internet giant sent its Street View cars to gather information.

Watchdog Blasts Google Over Data Collection Mistake

“Once again Google has demonstrated a lack of concern for privacy,” Consumer Watchdog Consumer Advocate John M. Simpson said in a statement. “Its computer engineers run amok, push the envelope and gather whatever data they can until their fingers are caught in the cookie jar. Then a Google executive apologizes, mouthing bafflegab about how privacy matters to the company.”

FTC Asked to Investigate Google Wi-Fi ‘Snooping’

Consumer Watchdog says the FTC should find out exactly what Google logged, how long it collected the information and what it ended up doing with it. “Google has demonstrated a history of pushing the envelope and then apologizing when its overreach is discovered,” the group said Monday in a press release. “Given its recent record of privacy abuses, there is absolutely no reason to trust anything the Internet giant claims about its data collection policies.”

Google Collecting Personal WiFi Data By Mistake

John Simpson of Consumer Watchdog, an advocacy group that is a frequent critic of Google, said the company had demonstrated a “lack of concern for privacy. Its computer engineers run amok, push the envelope and gather whatever data they can until their fingers are caught in the cookie jar,” Simpson said. “The takeaway from this incident is the clear need for government oversight and regulation of the data all online companies gather and store,” he said.

Google Apologizes Over Wi-Fi Data Collection

John Simpson from the Consumer Watchdog has said that appropriate government agencies must now ensure the data is appropriately deleted. “Once again Google has demonstrated a lack of concern for privacy,” said Mr Simpson. “Its computer engineers run amok, push the envelope and gather whatever data they can until their fingers are caught in the cookie jar. Then a Google executive apologizes, mouthing bafflegab about how privacy matters to the company. “The takeaway from this incident is the clear need for government oversight and regulation of the data all online companies gather and store,” he added.

Google Blasted for ‘Alarming’ Privacy Breaches

Consumer Watchdog, a group that has become one of Google’s most outspoken critics, renewed its call for a regulatory crackdown Friday. “Once again, Google has demonstrated a lack of concern for privacy,” said Consumer Watchdog’s John Simpson. “Its computer engineers run amok, push the envelope and gather whatever data they can until their fingers are caught in the cookie jar.”

Google Admits Vacuuming Up Data from Wi-Fi Networks, Apologizes

“Here they are just out and out snooping in neighborhoods and spying on people,” said John Simpson of Consumer Watchdog, a frequent Google critic who questioned whether Google violated wiretapping laws.

Trust the Census; worry about Google

Census Day – April 1 – got me thinking about the data the Census Bureau compiles about me.  Google’s partnership with the bureau got me thinking about who has the most data and who poses…

Can Google Be Trusted? No: The Search Engine Must Do More To Protect Private Data

Few doubt that Internet giant Google is succeeding in its audacious
corporate mission "to organize the world’s information and make it
universally accessible and useful." The problem is that the mission
puts Google directly at odds with our privacy rights, and Google
appears unwilling to give consumers enough control.

Google Books Settlement Facing Scrutiny

Concerns center on possible monopoly, invasion of privacy
 

John M. Simpson of Consumer Watchdog,
a California-based non-profit, said a key problem is the unfair
competitive advantage Google receives under the settlement that comes
from its attempt to pull an end-run around the appropriate legislative solution
to the orphan books problem. “This is not an issue for a court and
certainly one that cannot be settled by solving the problem for one
large corporation and no one else,” he said in testimony before the
House Judiciary Committee last week.