FTC’s Expected Record $22.5 Million Fine For Google Praised By Consumer Watchdog

Tue, Jul 10, 2012 at 1:04 pm

    FTC’s Expected Record $22.5 Million Fine For Google Praised By Consumer Watchdog

    Group Complained to Commission After Grad Student Discovered iPads, iPhones Were Hacked

    SANTA MNICA, CA – The Federal Trade Commission reportedly plans to fine Google $22.5 million for hacking around privacy settings on iPhones and iPads that use Apple’s Safari browser. Consumer Watchdog praised the Commission today for its expected strong action defending consumer privacy.

    Consumer Watchdog had filed a complaint in February with the FTC after Stanford Researcher Jonathan Mayer revealed what Google was doing.

    “Google hacked past a key privacy setting on iPhones and iPads and other devices using Apple’s Safari browser, placed tracking cookies on them and then lied, saying the settings were still effective,” said John M. Simpson, Consumer Watchdog’s Privacy Project director. “I am delighted the FTC appears ready to take strong action against an obvious violation of Google’s promises to honor users’ privacy in its ‘Buzz’ Consent Decree with the Commission.”

    The fine was expected to be the largest penalty ever imposed on a single company by the Commission. Under terms of the consent decree the FTC could fine Google up to $16,000 per violation per day.

    “The size of the fine is apparently a record for the FTC and in that context sends a strong message about the seriousness of Google’s wanton and egregious privacy violation,” said Simpson. “Nonetheless, it’s a drop in the bucket for Google.  It would have been better to base the fine on a substantial percentage of the company’s annual revenue, which was $40 billion last year. Google should feel real pain for its wanton violation.”

    Read Consumer Watchdog’s complaint to the FTC here: http://www.consumerwatchdog.org/resources/ltrleibowitz021712.pdf

    A study released Feb. 17 by Jonathan Mayer of Stanford University’s Security Lab, and the Center for Internet and Society, found that Google was circumventing a privacy setting in Apple’s Safari web browser.  Like most web browsers, Safari provides the option not to receive third-party “cookies.”  Cookies are small bits of code placed on the browser and can be used by ad networks to track you as you surf the web. Blocking third-party cookies is supposed to prevent such tracking.

    Safari is the primary browser on the iPhone and iPad. It is also the default browser on Apple’s computers.

    Read Jonathan Mayer’s study here: http://webpolicy.org/2012/02/17/safari-trackers/

    The Stanford study found that three other companies – Vibrant Media Inc., WPP PLC’s Media Innovation Group LLC and Gannett Co.’s PointRoll Inc. — were also circumventing the Safari privacy setting.

    It was not clear if the FTC plans action against those companies.  The Wall Street Journal’s Julia Angwin first reported news of the $22.5 million fine today.  Reports in May by Bloomberg News predicted a settlement in excess of $10 million.

    -30-

    Visit our website at www.ConsumerWatchdog.org

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    This post was written by:

    John M. Simpson

    - who has written 414 posts on Inside Google.


    Contact the author

    Leave a Reply

    ルイヴィトンは旅行の芸術なので、ルイヴィトンは比較的人気の高いブランドで、現在は手動で機械的に混合してパッケージングを行っています。 ルイヴィトンiphoneケースの海外での価格は、国民に比較的近いです。 しかし、エルメスは異なっています。馬が馬を生産するのは初めてです。そのため、エルメスは主に手作りの芸術であり、一般的な意味では贅沢ではありません。 エルメスiphoneケースのすべての製品は、芸術作品として楽しんで保存することができます。 ルイ?ヴィトンは、価格面ではルイ?ヴィトンよりもはるかに高いですが、質の面ではそれほど優れているわけではありませんが、近年では生産の増加により衰退の兆しが見えてきました。 最も顕著なパフォーマンスは、ブランド携帯ケース伝統的に手作業で加工された部品の多くが現在機械加工されていることです。加工の質は向上しますが、機械と労働は必ずしも成績ではありません。